anARtomy featured @ META

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Hand and forearm augmented by 3D skeletal system as seen through META Space Glasses

Our work on using augmented reality technology is now published on the META Blog page, featuring Drs. Markus Santoso and Christian Jacob, who demonstrate the LINDSAY aARtomy app. The application enables any physical 3D space to be enhanced, i.e., augmented by virtual elements. In the case of anARtomy, the virtual objects are anatomical systems, placed and scaled to size. What a way to create a learning environment!

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Human body systems placed on the floor of our LINDSAY lab and scaled to human size as seen through META Space Glasses

Check out the full story …

ASTech 2015 Award!

Trophy-ASTEch 2015Alberta Science and Technology Award

The LINDSAY Virtual Human team won the 2015 ASTech Award in the category of Innovation in Information and Communications Technology. Dr. Christian Jacob accepted the award on behalf of the LINDSAY team during the ASTech gala at TELUS Spark in Calgary on November 6, 2015.

Winning the 2015 Alberta Science and Technology award means an awful lot to us. This award recognizes the outstanding achievements of the LINDSAY team, the many contributions – big and small – that each team member has contributed to the project over many years. A project like this is only possible when passionate people come together and work on a shared vision. This is what the multi-disciplinary LINDSAY team has done and will continue to do.

The LINDSAY team feels humbled to be among such a distinguished group of innovative, creative and passionate people highlighted and recognized through the ASTech award. It is this kind of recognition that tells us that we are on the right track, and we are even further inspired to continue our mission of illustrating the wonders and beauty of the human body through the lens of computing.

See illustrative examples on the LINDSAY Video Channel.


 

What is this ASTech Award in ICT about?

A brief video prepared by the ASTech Foundation to illustrate the LINDSAY Virtual Human project.


See more on the ASTech Video Channel.


 

Talking about the LINDSAY Virtual Human Project

Christian Jacob shares his thoughts on the LINDSAY team’s achievements, his passionate team, the benefits of collaboration and teamwork, and why the province of Alberta, the city of Calgary and the University of Calgary are such fantastic places for innovation.


 

Impressions from ASTech 2.0: Accelerate!

Sharing our excitement which was building up over a most enjoyable evening …

ASTech 2015 Awards Gala at TELUS Spark in Calgary on November 6th, 2015

ASTech 2015 Awards Gala at TELUS Spark in Calgary on November 6th, 2015

Brief notes from the stage after announcing The LINDSAY Virtual Human team as the winner in the category of Innovation in Information and Communications Technology

Brief notes from the stage after announcing The LINDSAY Virtual Human team as the winner in the category of Innovation in Information and Communications Technology

Proudly showing off our plaque and winner's trophy

Proudly showing off the plaque and winner’s trophy

Christian Handshake-ASTEch 2015

Congratulations from Larry Vanderveen, Senior Market Manager from TELUS Broadband

ASTech brochure, trophy, and plaque notes with LINDSAY brochure

ASTech brochure, trophy, and plaque notes with LINDSAY brochure

CSWA Award for Giant Walkthrough Brain

The Canadian Science Writers’ Association has recognized our Giant Walkthrough Brain projects as a valuable contribution to the communication of science. Here is the original post from the CSWA awards site.

2014 Science in Society Communication Award

The Giant Walk Through Brain by Trevor Day, Jay Ingram and Christian Jacob.


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In 1972, neuroscientist Joseph Bogen suggested building a giant 60-story high science museum of the human brain. This giant walkthrough brain would educate and engage students and the public by taking them on guided tours inside, making it possible to visualize anatomical relationships among structures surrounding them. Although this architectural project remains an intriguing idea, the cost makes it unlikely an actual walk through brain will ever be built. However, modern computer technology and advances in computational human anatomy models provide another avenue for exploring a three-dimensional virtual human brain. Our team has developed “The Giant Walk through the Brain”, an innovative, engaging, narrative-driven public science communication performance which takes a live audience on a larger-than-life virtual tour of the human brain. “The Giant Walk Through Brain” is a live theatrical performance, including engaging, story-driven narration, dramatic 3-D computer animations and original live music.

Dr. Trevor Day is a neurobiologist and Associate Professor at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Alberta. He is music director and leader of the five-piece band “The Free Radicals”. They have written original music to accompany the narration and guided 3-D tour of the brain during the live performance. Dr. Christian Jacob is a Professor and director of the University of Calgary’s LINDSAY Virtual Human Project and the leader of the animation team. They have developed custom-made, scientifically accurate 3-D models and animations in the form of interactive fly-throughs to support the scientific and narrative content of the performance. Science broadcaster Jay Ingram wrote the narration and acts as tour guide for The Giant Walk Through Brain performance. He is a member of the Order of Canada with 30 years of broadcasting experience with CBC Radio and Discovery Channel, author of 13 books and co-founder of Calgary’s Art, Science and Engineering festival Beakerhead.


See our other posts about The Giant Walkthrough Brain project:

 

The Giant Walkthrough Brain at Beakerhead

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Breakerhead brochure with Giant Walkthrough Brain description

On September 12th and 13th, 2014, the Giant Walkthrough Brain is presented in the Dome Theatre at TELUS Spark, Calgary’s innovative science centre. The show is part of the annual Beakerhead festival which highlights art, science, and engineering across the city of Calgary.

In collaboration with science communicator and TV host Jay Ingram, the LINDSAY Virtual Human team has created a 3-dimensional, highly illustrative model of the human brain. In the 1970s, this idea was put forward by neurosurgeon Joseph Bogen, who proposed to build a neuroscience museum as a giant walkable brain. The Giant Walkthrough Brain is a live stage performance, with Jay Ingram as the fantastic story teller and The Free Radicals band presenting original music through a tour of fascinating findings, facts, and science (with some fiction) around the function and structure of the human brain.

Tatiana Karaman, Douglas Yuen, Dylan Dobbyn, and Justin Kelly — students in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary, have created the computer models and animations from which they constructed an incredible journey through a 3-dimensional, artistically rendered model of the human brain, enhanced by walkways, tunnels, info displays, and other features to create a true walkthrough experience.

The original brain models are provided by Zygote Media Group. The Giant Walkthrough Brain project received financial support from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Council of Canada (NSERC).

See the UToday story for more details on the show and on how modern information technology enhances science education and communication projects like the Giant Walkthrough Brain.

Also, don’t forget to check out the Beakerhead 2014 program guide.

Story:

  • Jay Ingram, science communicator, book author, tv host

Music:

  • The Free Radicals: Dr. Trevor Day, Steve Dodd, Ben Jackson, Garth Kennedy, Josip Vulic

3D Model Design:

  • Dr. Christian Jacob, design team lead
  • Tatiana Karaman, 3d modelling: brain, navigation pathways, on-stage “Brain Navigator”, M.Sc. student, Computational Media Design
  • Douglas Yuen, 3d navigation, slide show and movie integration, M.Sc. student, Computer Science
  • Dylan Dobbyn, 3d modeling: neural networks, synapse, BHSc student, Bioinformatics, Bachelor of Health Sciences,
  • Justin Kelly, 3d modeling: dendritic growth models, M.Sc. student, Computer Science

Computer Science Students bring Giant Brain to Life

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Back row, from left: Trevor Day, associate professor of physiology at Mount Royal University and leader, singer and rhythm guitar player for the Free Radicals band; Douglas Yuen and Justin Kelly, master’s students in computer science; and Dylan Dobbyn, undergraduate student in bioinformatics. Seated: Christian Jacob, professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary; Jay Ingram (on Facetime); and Tatiana Karaman, master’s student in the Computational Media Design program. Photo by Riley Brandt, University of Calgary

In collaboration with science communicator and TV host Jay Ingram, the LINDSAY Virtual Human team has created a 3-dimensional, highly illustrative model of the human brain. In the 1970s, this idea was put forward by neurosurgeon Joseph Bogen, who proposed to build a neuroscience museum as a giant walkable brain. The Giant Walkthrough Brain has been presented as a live stage performance at the Banff Centre’s Margaret Greenham Theatre, with Jay Ingram as the fantastic story teller and The Free Radicals band presenting original music through a tour of fascinating findings, facts, and science (with some fiction) around the function and structure of the human brain.

Dr. Christian Jacob has been leading a team of four students — Tatiana Karaman, Douglas Yuen, Dylan Dobbyn, and Justin Kelly — in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary, who made it their summer project to construct an incredible journey through a 3-dimensional, artistically rendered model of the human brain, enhanced by walkways, tunnels, info displays, and other features to create a true walkthrough experience.

See the UToday story for more details.

Story

  • Jay Ingram, science communicator, book author, tv host

Music

  • The Free Radicals: Dr. Trevor Day, Steve Dodd, Garth Kennedy, Josip Vulic, Robert Vulic

3D Model Design

  • Dr. Christian Jacob, design team lead
  • Tatiana Karaman, 3d modelling: brain, navigation pathways, on-stage “Brain Navigator”, M.Sc. student, Computational Media Design
  • Douglas Yuen, 3d navigation, slide show and movie integration, M.Sc. student, Computer Science
  • Dylan Dobbyn, 3d modeling: neural networks, synapse, BHSc student, Bioinformatics, Bachelor of Health Sciences,
  • Justin Kelly, 3d modeling: dendritic growth models, M.Sc. student, Computer Science

The Giant Walkthrough Brain project is financially supported by the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, the Department of Computer Science, and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

Lindsay Team is ASTech 2014 Honoree

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Image source: http://astech.ca/gala

The ASTech Foundation seeks to inspire innovation in the province of Alberta and honours its most outstanding people with this award.

The LINDSAY Virtual Human team is proud to be among the distinguished finalists for ASTech 2014. The ASTech Gala took place in Edmonton on October 15, 2014.

See the ASTech Gala site for more information, images, and videos.

LINDSAY featured at AAAS 2014 in Chicago

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Dr. Christian Jacob demonstrating engaging software for anatomy exploration: brain walkthrough (background screen), Zygote 3D Anatomy Atlas & Dissection Lab (iPad)

The LINDSAY Virtual Human project was introduced to an international audience on February 14 at the AAAS 2014 Annual Meeting during a symposium entitled “Virtual Humans: Helping Facilitate Breakthroughs in Medicine“.

See the UToday story for some more details.

Here is the symposium abstract from the AAAS website:

Advances in computer hardware and software has made it possible to model the human system in silico, conduct virtual experiments, and validate these with in vitro/in vivo experiments. In addition to developing realistic simulations of the human, a new emerging field—systems medicine—is facilitating the integration of various “omics” along with detailed engineering and mathematical models of the human system. This, in turn, has allowed significant improvements in medical diagnosis and treatment. In this symposium, experts in computer graphics, engineering, and medicine discuss current state-of-the-art and future directions in computer-based modeling of humans at various levels of abstraction and how computational models and simulations are aiding new discoveries in medicine. Key topics covered are P4 Medicine (Personalized, Predictive, Preventive, Participatory), drug validations through a virtual liver, cardiovascular simulation models, advancing education through virtual human anatomy and physiology, neural disorders modeling and simulation, and physics-based models of hip injury.

Speakers:

Here is a brief clip from a news report during the symposium.
 Marshall Bradshaw, AAAS News